Safety with eFoils


#104

I have the same Flier 400A esc. I used to have a lanyard coupled to the reciever signal to esc image but because this device started to leak it did not stop the motor as supposed. It is also sticking out of the board and could potentially hurt so I removed it. Now I rely on that the motor stops when I release the trigger or that the reciever loose contact with the tx because I hold it under water. It seems to work fine and it is nice not to have the rope around the foot. Does anybody think this is unsafe or have the experience that the esc do not stop when it loose contact with tx so that the board could go away and hit possibly somebody?.


#105

It depends on the inplementation on the reciver side, but it should work. In my lab setup I added an additional hall sensor to the receiver side. Magnet in front of hall sensor=OK. If the magnet is removed, the thortle slows down to 0. With a strong magnet it should work through the lid of the electronic campartment. Even if you pull the trigger, it stops the foil from running away as soon as you fall off and remove the magnet. Haven‘t tested in practice though.


#106

What about this thing? It has a rating of 100A with 500A peak for 5 seconds and voltage range from 12V to 48V. Don’t know how accurate this is though.


#107

I think I am going to go with a Momentary Push Button Panel Metal Switch for my foot, if placed just right would be a good way to perhaps have a instant cutout if you loose balance and it’a automatic 100, just stand on the led green motor, pretty straight forward yeah.

Anyone else doing this?


#108

What do you mean by ‘automatic 100’?

You would need to waterproof the button, as it is only IP65. Also you can’t cut the battery power with this (I think this might kill the ESC anyway if you’re unlucky), only receiver power - which you need to check if it’s safe to do.

Apart from that I can’t really imagine this being practical, you need to stand always exactly on the same point. And normally you do balancing steps around the center position of your feet during the ride.